Cheating hearts big business on Valentine’s Day

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In relationships where the thrill is gone, it’s far from wine and roses. Instead, many will spend hundreds of dollars on products and services to catch their mates in acts of infidelity.

Cheating Heart

As Valentine’s Day approaches, Allen Walton prepares for sales to spike at SpyGuySecurity.com, his online store in Dallas that sells spy cameras and other surveillance devices.

His average sales go up at least 20 percent in the couple of weeks leading up to Valentine’s Day and shortly after the holiday, he said, as people suspicious their mate is cheating invest in gadgets like spy cameras to verify their hunches.

Among his hottest-selling items this year are GPS trackers — tiny devices the size of a deck of cards that can be hidden inside a car or under a bumper. Using a mobile phone, the owners of the gadgets can log in and see exactly where a lover’s car is going.

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“When I take a customer’s phone call, I’m half salesman, half therapist,” said Walton. “They have no one to talk to about this kind of thing. They have to get it off their chest and find the best product for what they need.”

Many Americans shop for roses and chocolate hearts this time of year, with the average celebrant who splurges for a dinner out, a bottle of champagne, a heart-shaped box of chocolates, a dozen long-stemmed roses and princess-cut diamond earrings spending $512.02, according to Bankrate’s Be My Valentine Index for 2016.

But in relationships where the thrill is gone, it’s far from wine and roses. Worried that a spouse or significant other is cheating, many people spend hundreds of dollars on products and services that help them catch their mates in acts of infidelity. The businesses that assist them with their detective work — from those selling surveillance devices to private investigations firms — often see an uptick in business this time of year.

“It’s interesting there is this business of infidelity discovery, and that people in marriages or relationships that are challenged in some way would turn to an agency or piece of technology rather than their love sitting across the table from them for a solution,” said Trish McDermott, founder of Encore Dating, a business in the San Francisco Bay area that helps customers rebuild their lives after divorce.

“You’re more likely to get a better outcome with a frank conversation. Communication is the key to all relationships — even relationships ending.”

Source: cnbc

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